How to Swim with Dolphins in Oahu in the Wild

One of the most magical experiences you can have while visiting Hawaii is to swim with dolphins in Oahu in the wild (as opposed to swimming with dolphins in captivity).  I really cannot recommend it enough.  

In fact, I love it so much that I have done it numerous times!  And this is coming from someone who has been to Hawaii over 50 times. If you are interested in swimming with dolphins in Hawaii, you should absolutely do this. It is truly amazing.

To swim with dolphins in Oahu in the wild you have two options:

  1. Get in the ocean and try to find them yourself

  2. Go with a company that specializes in swimming with dolphins and knows how to find them without fail

If I were you I would go with option 2.  Assuming you agree, here is everything you need to know to swim with dolphins Oahu!

 

IF YOU PLAN TO VISIT OAHU, DON'T MISS THE TOP 10 THINGS TO DO ON OAHUA LOCAL'S GUIDE TO THE BEST PLACES TO EAT ON OAHU AND THE 10 BEST PLACES TO TAKE PHOTOS ON OAHU!

 

How to swim with dolphins in Oahu:

The company I personally use to swim with dolphins Oahu is Dolphin Excursions and I would highly suggest doing the safari (as they call it) through them.  They are located on the westside of Oahu in the town of Waianae.  Waianae is the best place to swim with dolphins on Oahu, hands down.

If you are looking to swim with dolphins Honolulu because you are staying there, you can’t really do that in the wild (at least not consistently). But depending on whether you have a car or not, you can either meet them in Waianae or have them pick you up at your hotel in Waikiki or Ko Olina.  

There are two Oahu dolphin swim tours per day - one at 7:30 am and one at 11 am.  I would recommend the earlier one as I have heard it is easier to find the dolphins then since they are just coming back from feeding at that time. Plus that way you are done back lunchtime so you still have time for another adventure!

Upon arrival to the harbor you will check in and fill out some paperwork, grab your gear (fins and a snorkel mask - these come with your safari at no extra cost), and if there is enough time there's a small cafe attached where you can grab coffee and some food.  Once everyone is ready, you walk down to the boat and hop on!

Once on the boat you'll have the opportunity to put your stuff in a wet box. I wasn't sure if it would be a good idea or not to bring my dSLR along, but because there's a wet box I'd say you definitely can.

Be careful though - everyone will throw their stuff in one box so make sure your equipment is in good casing or that you’re last to put your things in.

Click here to see the latest prices and reserve your spot!

 

Next up, the fun part! The three hour tour goes something like this:

  • Whale and dolphin watch from the boat

  • "The drop" - this is where you are actually dropped in a bay where they know dolphins are and you get to swim with them!

  • Snorkel with turtles, octopus, fish, and whatever else you can find

Last time we went we spotted tons of dolphins in the wild right away and ended up skipping the watch part in order to hop in with the dolphins, which just meant we got to swim with them for extra long (score!).

Once you are done, you'll head back to the cafe for lunch before being escorted back to Waikiki or Ko Olina.

Click here to see the latest prices and reserve your spot!

 

If you have something like a GoPro, definitely bring it. If not, a photographer comes on every excursion and will take photos of you in the water. You do have to pay to purchase those photos though.

Click here to see the latest prices and reserve your spot!

 

Note: if you are less adventurous, you can also pay to swim with dolphins in Hawaii at the Kahala Hotel or Sea Life Park, but those are dolphins in captivity, not swimming freely in the ocean with their families.  I did the Sea Life Park Dolphin Encounter Oahu experience in high school and it did not even compare to the experience with Dolphin Excursions.

 

Best Places to Stay in Oahu

Geographically speaking, you should stay in Honolulu (including Waikiki), Kailua, the North Shore (including Haleiwa), or Ko Olina. Click here for where to stay on Oahu - a local's guide!

If you prefer a more local experience, click here for the 11 best Airbnb Oahu rentals in Waikiki, Kailua, and the North Shore.

 
 

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